Examining the Perspectives of Latino Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Towards Advocacy

Meghan Maureen Burke, Kristina Rios, Marlene Garcia, Linda Sandman, Brenda Lopez, Sandra Magaña

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rapidly becoming the largest ethnic group of American students, compared to White students with disabilities, Latino students with disabilities receive less services and their parents are more likely to struggle to receive services. Yet, it is unclear how Latino families advocate for their children with disabilities including how cultural values facilitate their advocacy efforts. In this study, four focus groups were conducted with 46 Latino parents of children with autism spectrum disorder. Parents reported advocating by being assertive but not aggressive, being involved in school activities, communicating with the school and documenting the communication, and relying on knowledge and faith. Parents also reported facilitators (i.e., knowledge and resources, increased parent-school communication, and greater peer support) and barriers (i.e., poor school experiences, school related-stress, and stigma and discrimination) to advocacy. Implications for research, policy, and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-214
Number of pages14
JournalExceptionality
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2019

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autism
Hispanic Americans
parents
Parents
school
disability
Students
Communication
student
communication
Disabled Children
research policy
research practice
Focus Groups
Ethnic Groups
faith
ethnic group
discrimination
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Examining the Perspectives of Latino Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Towards Advocacy. / Burke, Meghan Maureen; Rios, Kristina; Garcia, Marlene; Sandman, Linda; Lopez, Brenda; Magaña, Sandra.

In: Exceptionality, Vol. 27, No. 3, 03.07.2019, p. 201-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burke, Meghan Maureen ; Rios, Kristina ; Garcia, Marlene ; Sandman, Linda ; Lopez, Brenda ; Magaña, Sandra. / Examining the Perspectives of Latino Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Towards Advocacy. In: Exceptionality. 2019 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 201-214.
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