Examining the efficacy of training interventions in improving older driver performance

John G. Gaspar, Mark B. Neider, Daniel J. Simons, Jason S. McCarley, Arthur F. Kramer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

An increasing number of commercial training products claim to improve older driver performance by train-ing underlying cognitive abilities. However, research examining transfer of such training to driving perfor-mance is limited. The current study examined whether 16 hours of training on a commercial training pack-age improved older adults' performance in a high-fidelity driving simulator. Data showed no differential improvements between the training group and a control group on any driving performance measure follow-ing training. The commercial training program did not improve the simulated driving performance of older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Pages144-148
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2012Oct 26 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

OtherProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/22/1210/26/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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  • Cite this

    Gaspar, J. G., Neider, M. B., Simons, D. J., McCarley, J. S., & Kramer, A. F. (2012). Examining the efficacy of training interventions in improving older driver performance. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 (pp. 144-148). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society). https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561007