Examining the differences in career thoughts of women in three low socioeconomic status groups

Jeanmarie Keim, David R. Strauser, Kristi Ketz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors examined differences in career thoughts of 3 groups of women from low socioeconomic status backgrounds. The 3 groups were composed of women who were not seeking employment, women attempting to obtain General Educational Development (GED) certification prior to seeking employment, and women with disabilities who were participating in readiness-to-work programs. Results indicated that there were significant differences in participants' career thoughts. Specifically, career thoughts of women who were not seeking employment were significantly less dysfunctional than were the career thoughts of the women who were pursuing their GED certification and those of the women with disabilities who were participating in a job-readiness training program. The impact of negative career thoughts is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-42
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Employment Counseling
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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