Examining potential differences between rotation-resistant and rotation-susceptible populations of western corn rootworms

Nicholas A. Tinsley, Michael E. Gray, Joseph L. Spencer, Ronald E. Estes, Thomas E. Hunt, Andrew T. Morehouse

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a significant insect pest of corn, Zea mays L. Larvae of this pest feed on root tissue and cause corn plants to be susceptible to lodging. Costs of control and yield losses are estimated to approach $1 billion annually in the United States. The failure of crop rotation to adequately manage western corn rootworms was first reported in the mid-1990s in east-central Illinois and northern Indiana. Since that time, the rotation-resistance trait has spread throughout much of the central Corn Belt. A field-experiment was designed to examine potential differences between rotation-resistant and rotation-susceptible populations of western corn rootworms. Some potential differences that are being explored are patterns of emergence, relative fitness, and the ability to injure transgenic Bt corn. Data from the first year of this multi-state, multi-year experiment will be discussed.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication58th Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America; 12-15 Dec 2010, San Diego, California
StatePublished - 2010

Keywords

  • INHS

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Examining potential differences between rotation-resistant and rotation-susceptible populations of western corn rootworms'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this