Evidence of Aggregation-Sex Pheromone Use by Longhorned Beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Species Native to Africa

Bridget Bobadoye, Baldwyn Torto, Ayuka Fombong, Yunfan Zou, Karl Adlbauer, Lawrence M. Hanks, Jocelyn G. Millar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During field bioassays in Kenya of 10 chemicals that are common pheromone components of cerambycid beetles, six species in the subfamily Cerambycinae were significantly attracted to 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one, and one species in the subfamily Lamiinae was significantly attracted to 2-(undecyloxy)ethanol (known as monochamol). These results further demonstrate that the former compound is highly conserved as a cerambycid pheromone because it has now been identified or implicated in the pheromones of numerous cerambycine species native to all six habitable continents. Similarly, monochamol has been identified or implicated as a pheromone component for species in the subfamily Lamiinae native to Asia, Europe, North America, and now Africa. The eight other compounds tested, including (E)-6,10-dimethyl-5,9-undecadien-2-ol (fuscumol), the corresponding (E)-6,10-dimethyl-5,9-undecadien-2-yl acetate (fuscumol acetate), syn- and anti-(2,3)-hexanediols and (2,3)-octanediols, 3-hydroxyoctan-2-one, and 3-hydroxydecan-2-one, did not attract significant numbers of any species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-192
Number of pages4
JournalEnvironmental entomology
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 13 2019

Keywords

  • 2-(undecyloxy)ethanol
  • 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one
  • Cerambycidae
  • management
  • semiochemical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Insect Science

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