Evidence for brood parasitism in a critically endangered Charadriiform with implications for conservation

Ashley L. Overbeek, Mark E. Hauber, Elizabeth Brown, Simone Cleland, Richard F. Maloney, Tammy E. Steeves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Two captive-reared birds of wild origin presumed to be Kakī/Black Stilt (Himantopus novaezelandiae) were found to display plumage atypical of Kakī. We have combined genetic and non-genetic data to test the hypothesis that these birds are a product of brood parasitism by “non-kakī” [i.e. Poaka/Pied Stilt (Himantopus himantopus leucocephalus) or Kakī–Poaka hybrids]. We found that these atypically plumed birds have cytochrome b haplotypes and microsatellite alleles that could not be attributed to the putative Kakī parents associated with the nest, thus providing the first evidence for brood parasitism in Kakī.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-337
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Ornithology
Volume158
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Black Stilt
  • Conservation management
  • Egg dumping
  • Hybrids
  • Interspecific brood parasitism
  • Pied Stilt

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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