Evaluation of iron and zinc bioavailability of beans targeted for biofortification using in vitro and in vivo models and their effect on the nutritional status of preschool children

Maria das Graças Vaz-Tostes, Thaisa Agrizzi Verediano, Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, Neuza Maria Brunoro Costa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Biofortified beans have been produced with higher nutrient concentrations. The objective was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo iron and zinc bioavailability of common beans Pontal (PO), targeted for biofortification, compared with conventional Perola (PE) and their effects on the iron and zinc nutritional status of preschool children. RESULTS: In Caco-2 cells, PO and PE beans did not show differences in ferritin (PO, 13.1±1.4; PE, 13.6±1.4ngmg-1 protein) or zinc uptake (PO, 15.9±1.5; PE, 15.5±3.5μmolmg-1 protein). In the rat, PO and PE beans presented high iron bioavailability (PO, 109.6±29.5; PE, 110.7±13.9%). In preschool children, no changes were observed in iron and zinc nutritional status comparing before and after PO consumption (ferritin, 41.2±23.2 and 28.9±40.4μgL-1; hemoglobin, 13.7±2.2 and 13.1±3.2g dL-1; plasma zinc, 119.2±24.5 and 133.9±57.7μg dL-1; erythrocyte zinc, 53.5±13.8 and 59.4±17.1μgg-1 hemoglobin). CONCLUSION: Iron and zinc bioavailability in PO and PE beans was not statistically different using either cell culture, animal or human models. Efforts should focus on increasing mineral bioavailability of beans targeted for biofortification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1326-1332
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Volume96
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2016

Keywords

  • Beans
  • Bioavailability
  • Biofortification
  • Iron
  • Zinc

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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