Evaluation of cold temperatures and density as mortality factors of the eucalyptus longhorned borer (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in California

Lawrence M. Hanks, Jocelyn G. Millar, Timothy D. Paine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

It was hypothesized that the northward spread of the eucalyptus longhorned borer, Phoracantha semipunctata F., in California is limited by winter temperature conditions. The cold tolerance of prepupal stages was tested by exposing infested logs to cold temperature treatments of -5, 0, +5, and +10°C for periods of 1, 3, 7, and 30 d. Temperature treatments had no affect on survivorship to adulthood or longevity but did reduce adult weight relative to nontreated control logs. Increasing exposure time to all cold temperatures significantly reduced both survivorship and adult weight but had no affect on adult longevity. Long periods of exposure to cold temperatures delayed emergence of adults and resulted in more closely synchronized emergence. Cold temperatures are unlikely to prevent the spread of this pest into most zones occupied by its eucalyptus host plants. In addition, increasing densities of prepupae in logs also resulted in significantly reduced survivorship to adulthood but did not affect adult weight or longevity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1653-1658
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental entomology
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Eucalyptus
  • Insecta
  • Phoracantha semipunctata
  • Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Insect Science

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