Evaluation of Aminolevulinic Acid-Derived Tumor Fluorescence Yields Disparate Results in Murine and Spontaneous Large Animal Models of Lung Cancer

Jarrod D. Predina, Jeffrey Runge, Andrew Newton, Michael Mison, Leilei Xia, Christopher Corbett, Michael Shin, Lydia Frenzel Sulyok, Amy Durham, Shuming Nie, Sunil Singhal, David Holt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Fluorescence guided surgery is an emerging technology that may improve accuracy of pulmonary resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Herein we explore optical imaging for NSCLC surgery using the well-studied protoporphyrin IX (PPIX)/5-aminiolevulinic acid (5-ALA) system. More specifically, we evaluate fluorescent patterns observed when using (1) commonly utilized in vitro and murine NSCLC models and with (2) spontaneous canine NSCLCs, which closely mimic human disease. Using flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy, we confirmed that NSCLC models fluoresce after exposure to 5-ALA in vitro. High levels of fluorescence were similarly observed in murine tumors within 2 hours of systemic 5-ALA delivery. When evaluating this approach in spontaneous canine NSCLC, tumor fluorescence was observed in 6 of 7 canines. Tumor fluorescence, however, was heterogenous owing to intratumoral variations in cellularity and necrosis. Margin and lymph node detection was inaccurate. These data demonstrate the importance of incorporating reliable cancer models into preclinical evaluations of optical agents. Utilization of spontaneous large animal models of cancer may further provide an important intermediate in the path to human translation of optical contrast agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7629
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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