Evaluating Five Factor Theory and social investment perspectives on personality trait development

Brent W. Roberts, Dustin Wood, Jennifer L. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this paper, we evaluate the Five Factor Theory (FFT; McCrae & Costa, 1999) and Social Investment (Helson, Kwan, John, & Jones, 2002; Roberts & Wood, in press) explanations of normative personality trait development in adulthood. FFT theory proposes that personality trait development is largely a genetic phenomenon, whereas the Social Investment theory proposes that it is largely the result of experiences in universal social roles in young adulthood. A review of cross-cultural, longitudinal, and behavior genetics studies reveals little support for the FFT position and provisional support for the Social Investment theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-184
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume39
Issue number1 SPEC. ISS.
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluating Five Factor Theory and social investment perspectives on personality trait development'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this