Evaluating cultivars for organic farming: Maize, soybean, and wheat genotype by system interactions in Eastern Nebraska

Sam E. Wortman, Charles A. Francis, Tomie D. Galusha, Chris Hoagland, Justin van Wart, P. Stephen Baenziger, Thomas Hoegemeyer, Maury Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A common hypothesis among farmers is that there are unique crop traits necessary to achieve high yields in organic systems not currently expressed in conventionally developed cultivars. To test this hypothesis, high-yielding cultivars of three annual crops developed in conventional systems were grown in parallel organic and conventional cropping systems over multiple years. Yield results revealed no consistent genotype by system interactions. We conclude that with conventionally developed cultivars it is logical to choose the highest yielding genotypes based on nonbiased yield comparison trials in conventional systems unless results are available from organic evaluations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-932
Number of pages18
JournalAgroecology and Sustainable Food Systems
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Genotype × system
  • Maize breeding
  • Organic cultivars
  • Soybean breeding
  • Specific adaptation
  • Wheat breeding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Development
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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