Ethnic and racial fragmentation: Toward a reinterpretation of a local labor movement

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Perhaps the most striking characteristic of early twentieth century American working-class history is the extreme diversity in experience. Racial, ethnic, and gender differences; labor market stratification; uneven economic and social development across geographic regions—all meant that various groups of workers experienced class in decidedly different ways. In fact, some historians would argue that this fragmented experience led to a sort of “unmaking” of the American working class in these years.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe African American Urban Experience
Subtitle of host publicationPerspectives from the Colonial Period to the Present
EditorsJoe W Trotter, Earl Lewis, Tera W Hunter
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages287-309
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9781403979162
ISBN (Print)9780312294649
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 17 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • labor movement
  • open shop
  • black worker
  • labor party
  • Cook County

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

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  • Cite this

    Barrett, J. R. (2004). Ethnic and racial fragmentation: Toward a reinterpretation of a local labor movement. In J. W. Trotter, E. Lewis, & T. W. Hunter (Eds.), The African American Urban Experience: Perspectives from the Colonial Period to the Present (pp. 287-309). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781403979162_14