Estrogen platinum-diamine complexes: Preparation of a non-steroidal estrogen platinum-diamine complex labeled with platinum-191 and a study of its binding to the estrogen receptor in vitro and its tissue distribution in vivo

James P. DiZio, Kathryn E. Carlson, Christopher J. Bannochie, Michael J. Welch, Erwin von Angerer, John A. Katzenellenbogen

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Abstract

We have prepared in radiolabeled form (platinum-191) a non-steroidal estrogen platinum-diamine complex (Pt-diamine complex) that is reported to have selective cytostatic activity in estrogen receptor positive mouse mammary tumors. We then studied the interaction of this metal radiolabeled complex with the estrogen receptor in vitro and its distribution in immature rats in vivo. The radiolabeled complex was prepared by incubation of the non-steroidal estrogen diamine with [191Pt](II)Cl4-2(t 1 2 = 2.96 days, sp. act. 7.54 Ci/mmol) in dimethylformamide (DMF)/H2O, followed by purification by HPLC. The final radiolabeled product coeluted with an authentic standard of the unlabeled Pt-diamine complex, with a retention time distinct from those of the precursor diamine and chloroplatinate. In competitive radiometric receptor binding assays with rat uterine estrogen receptor, samples of the unlabeled diamine and Pt-diamine complex have apparent binding affinities of 53±3% and 32 ± 11%, respectively, relative to estradiol (RBA = 100% as standard). However, attempts to observe the binding of the 191Pt-diamine complex with the estrogen receptor were complicated by a very high level of non-receptor binding, an irreversible binding to proteins in the receptor preparation, and a degradation of the platinum complex that, in part, releases the diamine. As a result, it is difficult to be certain whether the binding affinity measured for the Pt-diamine complex in the competitive binding assays is due to the complex itself, or whether it arises from diamine released upon degradation of the complex. In tissue distribution studies in immature female rats, much of the 191Pt-diamine complex was deposited in the liver; there was no evidence of selective uptake of this compound by estrogen target tissues. Thus, it is not clear, from these studies, that the observed bioactivity of this complex arises from the interaction of the Pt complex or the diamine ligand with the estrogen receptor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-373
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume42
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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