Estrogen fueled, nuclear kiss: Did it move for you?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A paper appearing in late 2008,1 attracted considerable attention with its description of a dramatic juxtaposition of two estrogen responsive genes on different chromosomes within 15-60 minutes of adding estradiol. These results challenged a growing consensus of limited chromosome mobility within interphase nuclei, while raising questions of whether a hitherto unknown molecular mechanism might exist to move chromosomes long distances within the nucleus. These results also raised the fascinating question of how two genes on widely separated chromosomes might find each other over such a short time span. Now, a more recent paper2 reports no such longrange interaction or chromosome movements in the same cell types under what appear to be well replicated conditions, forcing a reexamination of the prior results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number13051
JournalNucleus
Volume1
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Estrogens
Chromosomes
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15
Interphase
Genes
Estradiol

Keywords

  • 3C
  • Chromatin mobility
  • Chromosome territory
  • Gene kissing
  • Nuclear speckles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Estrogen fueled, nuclear kiss : Did it move for you? / Belmont, Andrew S.

In: Nucleus, Vol. 1, No. 5, 13051, 01.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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