Esther V. Cooper’s ‘The Negro Woman Domestic Worker in Relation to Trade Unionism’: Black Left Feminism and the Popular Front

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Esther V. Cooper’s brilliant 120-page 1940 M.A. thesis, ‘‘The Negro Woman Domestic Worker in Relation to Trade Unionism,’’ still stands as the most thorough sociological and historical study written on the working conditions and status of black women household workers and their efforts to unionize during the Depression. The ‘‘Negro Woman Domestic Worker’’ was a crucial part of her early intellectual foundation, helping to set the stage for her staunch support for civil rights, social justice, internationalism, and radical democracy with special concern for African-American women that were trade marks of her life’s work. It also stands as a marker for what could have been a significantly different life journey for her.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRed Activists and Black Freedom
Subtitle of host publicationJames and Esther Jackson and the Long Civil Rights Revolution
EditorsDavid Levering Lewis, Michael H Nash, Daniel J. Leab
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherRoutledge
Pages33-40
ISBN (Electronic)9781317990604
StatePublished - 2010

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