Environmental quality in animal production housing facilities: A review and evaluation of alternative ventilation strategies

Gerald L. Riskowski, Ronaldo G. Maghirang, Ted L. Funk, Leslie L. Christianson, John B. Priest

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Experts on animal production housing design were surveyed to determine current knowledge, identify potential control measures, and define research and development needs on indoor air quality in production animal facilities. Results indicated that for larger, more mature animals, properly designed and controlled natural ventilation systems are effective in providing good environments. For colder climates and more sensitive animals, a combined system with mechanical ventilation for cold weather and natural ventilation for warm weather works well. Experts noted that the high concentration of particulate matter is the most prevalent indoor air quality problem in animal housing facilities. They also noted that most problems with poor indoor air quality are due to poor design and management of existing technologies. To improve air quality in animal production housing facilities, better ventilation systems and air cleaners should be developed and utilized. Additionally, improving design and management of existing technology should be undertaken.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-113
Number of pages10
JournalASHRAE Transactions
Volume104
Issue numberPt 1A
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1998 ASHRAE Winter Meeting. Part 1 (of 2) - San Francisco, CA, USA
Duration: Jan 18 1998Jan 21 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

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