Employee use and perceived benefit of a complementary and alternative medicine wellness clinic at a major military hospital: Evaluation of a pilot program

Alaine D. Duncan, Janet M. Liechty, Cathy Miller, Gail Chinoy, Richard Ricciardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility of a weekly on-site complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) wellness clinic for staff at a military hospital, and to describe employees' perceptions of program effectiveness. Setting: The study setting was the Restore & Renew® Wellness Clinic at a United States Department of Defense hospital. Subjects: The subjects were hospital nurses, physicians, clinicians, support staff, and administrators. Interventions: The walk-in wellness clinic was open 8:00 am-2:00 pm 1 day a week. Participants selected one or more modalities each visit: ear acupuncture, clinical acupressure, and Zero Balancing.® Outcome measures: A self-report survey was done after each clinic visit to evaluate clinic features and perceived impact on stress-related symptoms, compassion for patients, sleep, and workplace or personal relationships. Results: Surveys completed after first-time and repeat visits (n=2,756 surveys) indicated that most participants agreed or strongly agreed they felt more relaxed after sessions (97.9%), less stress (94.5%), more energy (84.3%), and less pain (78.8%). Ninety-seven percent (97%) would recommend it to a co-worker. Among surveys completed after five or more visits, more than half (59%-85%) strongly agreed experiencing increased compassion with patients, better sleep, improved mood, and more ease in relations with co-workers. Perceived benefits were sustained and enhanced by number of visits. The most frequently reported health habit changes were related to exercise, stress reduction, diet/nutrition, and weight loss. Conclusions: This evaluation suggests that a hospital-based wellness clinic based on CAM principles and modalities is feasible, well-utilized, and perceived by most participants to have positive health benefits related to stress reduction at work, improved mood and sleep, and lifestyle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)809-815
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

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Military Hospitals
Complementary Therapies
Reducing Diet
Sleep
United States Department of Defense
Ear Acupuncture
Acupressure
Nurse Clinicians
Program Evaluation
Insurance Benefits
Ambulatory Care
Administrative Personnel
Workplace
Self Report
Habits
Life Style
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Exercise
Physicians
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

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Employee use and perceived benefit of a complementary and alternative medicine wellness clinic at a major military hospital : Evaluation of a pilot program. / Duncan, Alaine D.; Liechty, Janet M.; Miller, Cathy; Chinoy, Gail; Ricciardi, Richard.

In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 9, 01.09.2011, p. 809-815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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