Emerging trends and opportunities in discrete-frequency infrared and Raman spectroscopic imaging

Tomasz P. Wrobel, Matthew R. Kole, Rohit Bhargava

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Recent advances in instrumentation have enabled new forms of vibrational chemical imaging, including discrete-frequency infrared (DFIR) microscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. These technologies may represent a fundamental shift in how we approach spectroscopic imaging: Rather than collecting full spectra that contain redundant information, measuring a few important spectral frequencies may enable significant gains in speed, throughput, signal-to-noise ratio, and image quality. For IR microscopy, these advantages may be compounded by high-definition IR microscopy. Here we discuss recent advances in IR and nonlinear Raman imaging through the lens of "discrete-frequency" approaches and include several examples of applications and critical issues in instrumentation that are likely to be dominant research themes in the near future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSpectroscopy (Santa Monica)
Volume31
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2016

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emerging
Microscopic examination
microscopy
Infrared radiation
trends
Imaging techniques
Stimulated Raman scattering
Image quality
Lenses
Signal to noise ratio
signal to noise ratios
lenses
Throughput
Raman spectra
shift

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Spectroscopy

Cite this

Emerging trends and opportunities in discrete-frequency infrared and Raman spectroscopic imaging. / Wrobel, Tomasz P.; Kole, Matthew R.; Bhargava, Rohit.

In: Spectroscopy (Santa Monica), Vol. 31, No. 6, 06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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