Embodying climate change: Incorporating full body tracking in the design of an interactive rates of change greenhouse gas simulation

James Planey, Robb Lindgren

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The ELASTIC3S project creates novel immersive simulations aimed at exploring in detail the connection between purposeful gesture and learning transfer across science content domains. This paper describes the theory and design behind the most recent addition: a dynamic, two-participant, gesture-controlled rates of change simulation addressing climate change through the lens of the greenhouse effect. Leveraging a flexible “one-shot” gesture recognition system and a 3-screen immersive simulation theater, participants work together to explore a representation of the greenhouse effect while embodying concepts of rates of change and dynamic equilibrium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationImmersive Learning Research Network - 4th International Conference, iLRN 2018, Proceedings
EditorsDennis Beck, Colin Allison, Todd Ogle, Johanna Pirker, Christian Gutl, Jonathon Richter, Leonel Morgado, Anasol Pena-Rios
PublisherSpringer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Pages23-35
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9783319935959
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event4th International Conference on Immersive Learning Research Network, iLRN 2018 - [state] MT, United States
Duration: Jun 24 2018Jun 29 2018

Publication series

NameCommunications in Computer and Information Science
Volume840
ISSN (Print)1865-0929

Other

Other4th International Conference on Immersive Learning Research Network, iLRN 2018
CountryUnited States
City[state] MT
Period6/24/186/29/18

Keywords

  • Embodied design
  • Embodied learning
  • Gesture
  • Immersive learning
  • Rates of change
  • Science simulation
  • Simulation theaters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Mathematics(all)

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