Efficacy of oral potassium chloride administration in treating lactating dairy cows with experimentally induced hypokalemia, hypochloremia, and alkalemia

P. D. Constable, M. W.H. Hiew, S. Tinkler, J. Townsend

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hypokalemia occurs commonly in lactating dairy cows. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) whether a 24-h oral KCl dose of 0.4. g/kg of body weight (BW) was effective and safe in hypokalemic cattle; (2) whether potassium was best administered as 2 large doses or multiple smaller doses over a 24-h period; and (3) the effect of oral KCl administration on plasma Mg concentration and urine Mg excretion in fasted lactating dairy cattle. Plasma K and Cl concentrations were decreased, and blood pH increased, in 15 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows by administering 2 intramuscular (i.m.) 10-mg injections of isoflupredone acetate 24. h apart followed by 2 i.m. injections of furosemide (1. mg/kg of BW) 8. h apart and by decreasing feed intake. Cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups with 5 cows/group: untreated control (group C); oral administration of KCl at 0.05. g/kg of BW 8 times at 3-h intervals (group K3); and oral administration of KCl at 0.2. g/kg of BW twice at 12-h intervals (group K12). A 24-h KCl dose rate of 0.4. g/kg of BW increased plasma and milk K concentration and plasma Cl concentration, and corrected the metabolic alkalosis and alkalemia, with no clinically significant difference between 2 large doses (group K12) or multiple small doses (group K3) of KCl over 24 h. Oral KCl administration decreased peripheral fat mobilization in cattle with experimentally induced hypokalemia, as measured by changes in plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentration, and slightly augmented the fasting-induced decrease in plasma Mg concentration. Our findings support recommendations for a 24-h oral KCl dose of 0.4. g/kg of BW for treating moderately hypokalemic cattle. Additional Mg may need to be administered to inappetant lactating dairy cattle being treated with oral KCl to minimize K-induced decreases in magnesium absorption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1413-1426
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
Volume97
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alkalemia
  • Hypochloremia
  • Hypomagnesemia
  • Potassium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Efficacy of oral potassium chloride administration in treating lactating dairy cows with experimentally induced hypokalemia, hypochloremia, and alkalemia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this