Effects of three cutting blade designs on energy consumption during mowing-conditioning of Miscanthus Giganteus

Hao Gan, Sunil Mathanker, Md Abdul Momin, Brendan Kuhns, Neal Stoffel, Alan Christopher Hansen, Tony E Grift

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study compared energy consumption during harvest of Miscanthus Giganteus with a New Holland H8080 mower-conditioner among three cutting blade designs being 1) straight, 2) straight, angled at 30° and 3) serrated. Square bales were produced by a New Holland BB9080 large square baler. To calculate energy consumption per unit crop mass in MJ Mg−1, bales of known mass were identified, and the cutting energy to produce this bale was calculated by accumulating the mower-conditioner's energy consumption across the collection area associated with that bale. Energy consumption was also expressed as a Percentage of Inherent Heating Value (PIHV), where energy consumption was divided by the heating value of Miscanthus Giganteus (17.7 GJ Mg−1). Average energy requirement for the whole machine were 12.31 MJ Mg−1 (0.070 PIHV), 11.31 MJ Mg−1 (0.064 PIHV), and 9.27 MJ Mg−1 (0.052 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. Average energy requirements for the header were 9.50 MJ Mg−1 (0.054 PIHV), 8.32 MJ Mg−1 (0.047 PIHV), and 7.20 MJ Mg−1 (0.041 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. Average energy requirements for traction were 0.96 MJ Mg−1 (0.005 PIHV), 1.21 MJ Mg−1 (0.007 PIHV), and 1.04 MJ Mg−1 (0.006 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. The theoretical field capacity increased from straight blades at 1.35 ha h−1 to angled blades at 1.52 ha h−1 to serrated blades at 2.23 ha h−1. Evidently, the design of cutting blades had a significant effect on energy consumption and field performance of biomass harvesting equipment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-171
Number of pages6
JournalBiomass and Bioenergy
Volume109
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

Fingerprint

Miscanthus giganteus
mowing
conditioning
Energy utilization
heating
heat
Heating
conditioner mowers
Lawn mowers
energy requirements
energy
cutting (process)
effect
energy consumption
harvesting equipment
field capacity
Crops
Biomass

Keywords

  • Bioenergy
  • Biomass
  • Disc-cutter
  • Field capacity
  • Harvesting
  • Machine performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Waste Management and Disposal

Cite this

Effects of three cutting blade designs on energy consumption during mowing-conditioning of Miscanthus Giganteus. / Gan, Hao; Mathanker, Sunil; Momin, Md Abdul; Kuhns, Brendan; Stoffel, Neal; Hansen, Alan Christopher; Grift, Tony E.

In: Biomass and Bioenergy, Vol. 109, 02.2018, p. 166-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gan, Hao ; Mathanker, Sunil ; Momin, Md Abdul ; Kuhns, Brendan ; Stoffel, Neal ; Hansen, Alan Christopher ; Grift, Tony E. / Effects of three cutting blade designs on energy consumption during mowing-conditioning of Miscanthus Giganteus. In: Biomass and Bioenergy. 2018 ; Vol. 109. pp. 166-171.
@article{829ed6c4dba54d1289ba602d03a1c6f8,
title = "Effects of three cutting blade designs on energy consumption during mowing-conditioning of Miscanthus Giganteus",
abstract = "This study compared energy consumption during harvest of Miscanthus Giganteus with a New Holland H8080 mower-conditioner among three cutting blade designs being 1) straight, 2) straight, angled at 30° and 3) serrated. Square bales were produced by a New Holland BB9080 large square baler. To calculate energy consumption per unit crop mass in MJ Mg−1, bales of known mass were identified, and the cutting energy to produce this bale was calculated by accumulating the mower-conditioner's energy consumption across the collection area associated with that bale. Energy consumption was also expressed as a Percentage of Inherent Heating Value (PIHV), where energy consumption was divided by the heating value of Miscanthus Giganteus (17.7 GJ Mg−1). Average energy requirement for the whole machine were 12.31 MJ Mg−1 (0.070 PIHV), 11.31 MJ Mg−1 (0.064 PIHV), and 9.27 MJ Mg−1 (0.052 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. Average energy requirements for the header were 9.50 MJ Mg−1 (0.054 PIHV), 8.32 MJ Mg−1 (0.047 PIHV), and 7.20 MJ Mg−1 (0.041 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. Average energy requirements for traction were 0.96 MJ Mg−1 (0.005 PIHV), 1.21 MJ Mg−1 (0.007 PIHV), and 1.04 MJ Mg−1 (0.006 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. The theoretical field capacity increased from straight blades at 1.35 ha h−1 to angled blades at 1.52 ha h−1 to serrated blades at 2.23 ha h−1. Evidently, the design of cutting blades had a significant effect on energy consumption and field performance of biomass harvesting equipment.",
keywords = "Bioenergy, Biomass, Disc-cutter, Field capacity, Harvesting, Machine performance",
author = "Hao Gan and Sunil Mathanker and Momin, {Md Abdul} and Brendan Kuhns and Neal Stoffel and Hansen, {Alan Christopher} and Grift, {Tony E}",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.biombioe.2017.12.033",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "109",
pages = "166--171",
journal = "Biomass and Bioenergy",
issn = "0961-9534",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of three cutting blade designs on energy consumption during mowing-conditioning of Miscanthus Giganteus

AU - Gan, Hao

AU - Mathanker, Sunil

AU - Momin, Md Abdul

AU - Kuhns, Brendan

AU - Stoffel, Neal

AU - Hansen, Alan Christopher

AU - Grift, Tony E

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - This study compared energy consumption during harvest of Miscanthus Giganteus with a New Holland H8080 mower-conditioner among three cutting blade designs being 1) straight, 2) straight, angled at 30° and 3) serrated. Square bales were produced by a New Holland BB9080 large square baler. To calculate energy consumption per unit crop mass in MJ Mg−1, bales of known mass were identified, and the cutting energy to produce this bale was calculated by accumulating the mower-conditioner's energy consumption across the collection area associated with that bale. Energy consumption was also expressed as a Percentage of Inherent Heating Value (PIHV), where energy consumption was divided by the heating value of Miscanthus Giganteus (17.7 GJ Mg−1). Average energy requirement for the whole machine were 12.31 MJ Mg−1 (0.070 PIHV), 11.31 MJ Mg−1 (0.064 PIHV), and 9.27 MJ Mg−1 (0.052 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. Average energy requirements for the header were 9.50 MJ Mg−1 (0.054 PIHV), 8.32 MJ Mg−1 (0.047 PIHV), and 7.20 MJ Mg−1 (0.041 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. Average energy requirements for traction were 0.96 MJ Mg−1 (0.005 PIHV), 1.21 MJ Mg−1 (0.007 PIHV), and 1.04 MJ Mg−1 (0.006 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. The theoretical field capacity increased from straight blades at 1.35 ha h−1 to angled blades at 1.52 ha h−1 to serrated blades at 2.23 ha h−1. Evidently, the design of cutting blades had a significant effect on energy consumption and field performance of biomass harvesting equipment.

AB - This study compared energy consumption during harvest of Miscanthus Giganteus with a New Holland H8080 mower-conditioner among three cutting blade designs being 1) straight, 2) straight, angled at 30° and 3) serrated. Square bales were produced by a New Holland BB9080 large square baler. To calculate energy consumption per unit crop mass in MJ Mg−1, bales of known mass were identified, and the cutting energy to produce this bale was calculated by accumulating the mower-conditioner's energy consumption across the collection area associated with that bale. Energy consumption was also expressed as a Percentage of Inherent Heating Value (PIHV), where energy consumption was divided by the heating value of Miscanthus Giganteus (17.7 GJ Mg−1). Average energy requirement for the whole machine were 12.31 MJ Mg−1 (0.070 PIHV), 11.31 MJ Mg−1 (0.064 PIHV), and 9.27 MJ Mg−1 (0.052 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. Average energy requirements for the header were 9.50 MJ Mg−1 (0.054 PIHV), 8.32 MJ Mg−1 (0.047 PIHV), and 7.20 MJ Mg−1 (0.041 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. Average energy requirements for traction were 0.96 MJ Mg−1 (0.005 PIHV), 1.21 MJ Mg−1 (0.007 PIHV), and 1.04 MJ Mg−1 (0.006 PIHV) for straight, angled and serrated blades respectively. The theoretical field capacity increased from straight blades at 1.35 ha h−1 to angled blades at 1.52 ha h−1 to serrated blades at 2.23 ha h−1. Evidently, the design of cutting blades had a significant effect on energy consumption and field performance of biomass harvesting equipment.

KW - Bioenergy

KW - Biomass

KW - Disc-cutter

KW - Field capacity

KW - Harvesting

KW - Machine performance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044344011&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044344011&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.biombioe.2017.12.033

DO - 10.1016/j.biombioe.2017.12.033

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85044344011

VL - 109

SP - 166

EP - 171

JO - Biomass and Bioenergy

JF - Biomass and Bioenergy

SN - 0961-9534

ER -