Effects of spray-dried bovine plasma protein in milk replacers fed at a high plane of nutrition on performance, intestinal permeability, and morbidity of Holstein calves

B. S. Henrichs, K. N. Brost, C. A. Hayes, J. M. Campbell, J. K. Drackley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Spray-dried plasma protein (SDP) has been shown to improve growth and intestinal function in young calves when included in milk replacers (MR) fed at conventional rates. Use of an SDP and wheat protein blend to replace a portion of whey protein has been shown to perform similarly to using an all-whey protein control MR. However, a trend in the dairy industry is to feed calves for greater rates of growth during the preweaning period. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of increasing amounts of SDP inclusion in MR on growth and health of calves fed at a high plane of nutrition. Young (<7 d) Holstein calves were offered starter and assigned to 1 of 5 MR treatments: an all-milk protein (whey) control MR (0SDP, n = 26) or MR containing 5% SDP (5SDP, n = 20), 7.5% SDP (7.5SDP, n = 14), 10% SDP (10SDP, n = 20), or 12% of an approximate 1:1 SDP plus wheat protein blend (PW, n = 17). All MR were formulated to contain 26% CP and 16% fat and were fed at a maximum rate of 1 kg of powder (as fed) from d 8 to 36. Amounts of MR powder were decreased by 25%/wk from d 37 to weaning at d 57. Thereafter, calves were provided only starter feed until the end of the study at d 63. On d 4, 15, 36, and 57, intestinal permeability was assessed via oral administration of lactulose and D-mannitol followed by analysis of lactulose and mannitol in blood at 60 min after administration. Increasing SDP led to a small linear decrease in MR consumed. There was a tendency for a positive linear relationship between increasing SDP and average daily gain of body weight, and SDP had mixed effects on body frame variables. Increasing SDP tended to increase fecal scores and increased the amount of fluid therapy given. Diet had no effect on intestinal permeability. Increasing SDP led to an increase in serum total cholesterol and serum urea N and tended to have a quadratic effect on serum glucose concentration on d 36. Calves fed PW tended to have increased withers height, increased intestinal permeability on d 36, and an increased likelihood of being medicated for any reason or being medicated for respiratory illness, but growth and health were not different from the control diet otherwise. Feeding PW led to an increase in serum total cholesterol and tended to lead to increased serum glucose concentration on d 36. Results of this study indicate that SDP can be included at up to 10% as fed in the MR of calves fed at a high plane of nutrition (1 kg/d of MR powder, as fed) with improvements in average daily gain. Additionally, a 1:1 SDP plus wheat protein blend can be used at 12% inclusion with no difference in most health and growth parameters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7856-7870
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
Volume104
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • calf growth
  • intestinal permeability
  • plasma wheat blend
  • spray-dried plasma protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Genetics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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