Effects of shopping information on consumers' responses to comparative price claims

Edward A. Blair, Judy Harris, Kent B. Monroe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article describes three studies that examine the effects of shopping information on consumers' responses to comparative price claims in retail advertisements. Results of the studies show that 1) the opportunity to shop across retail stores reduces the effect of comparative price claims on consumers' estimates of lowest price for a particular item, but has less impact on their estimates of the store's regular price; 2) access to advertising from competing retailers has the same pattern of effects; and 3) across exposure to a series of ad claims, these effects generalize from estimates of specific item prices to judgments of the store's general pricing. For branded shopping goods, the results show that comparative price claims may prove counterproductive for retail advertisers by leading consumers to believe that the store's regular prices are high without convincing them that its sale prices are low.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-181
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Retailing
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 19 2002

Keywords

  • Comparative prices
  • Price image
  • Reference prices
  • Retail advertising

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

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