Effects of rearing complexity on dendritic branching in frontolateral and temporal cortex of the rat

William T. Greenough, Fred R. Volkmar, Janice M Juraska

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dendritic branching was studied in Golgi-stained neurons from frontolateral and temporal cortex of rats reared for 30 days after weaning in complex, social, or isolated environments. In temporal cortex, layer-4 pyramidal neurons from rats reared in complex environments had significantly more basal dendritic branches than those from littermates reared socially or in isolation. Layer-5 pyramidal neurons showed similar rearing effects. In contrast, no significant differences due to rearing were detected in frontal cortex. In both regions, there was a high degree of concordance within litters. These results amplify those of previous studies and indicate that: the effects of environmental complexity on dendritic branching are not restricted to those previously seen in visual cortex; the effects are not seen in all cortical areas or neuronal populations as might be expected if they reflected a general hormonal or nutritional difference; and both the non-universality of the effects and the relative concordance within litters suggest that equivalent neuronal populations are stained in the different environmental groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-378
Number of pages8
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1973

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

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