Effects of prebiotic inulin-type fructans on blood metabolite and hormone concentrations and faecal microbiota and metabolites in overweight dogs

Celeste Alexander, Tzu Wen L. Cross, Saravanan Devendran, Franka Neumer, Stephan Theis, Jason M. Ridlon, Jan S. Suchodolski, Maria R.C. de Godoy, Kelly S. Swanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Because obesity is associated with many co-morbidities, including diabetes mellitus, this study evaluated the second-meal effect of a commercial prebiotic, inulin-type fructans, and the effects of the prebiotic on faecal microbiota, metabolites and bile acids (BA). Nine overweight beagles were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square design to test a non-prebiotic control (cellulose) against a low (equivalent to 0·5 % diet) and high dose (equivalent to 1·0 % diet) of prebiotic over 14-d treatments. All dogs were fed the same diet twice daily, with treatments provided orally via gelatin capsules before meals. On days 13 or 14 of each period, fresh faecal samples were collected, dogs were fed at 08.00 hours and then challenged with 1 g/kg body weight of maltodextrin in place of the 16.00 hours meal. Repeated blood samples were analysed for glucose and hormone concentrations to determine postprandial incremental AUC (IAUC) data. Baseline glucose, insulin and active glucagon-like peptide-1 levels were similar between all groups (P>0·10). Glucose and insulin IAUC after glucose challenge appeared lower following the high dose, but did not reach statistical relevance. Prebiotic intervention resulted in an increase in relative abundance of some Firmicutes and a decrease in the relative abundance of some Proteobacteria. Individual and total faecal SCFA were significantly increased (P<0·05) following prebiotic supplementation. Total concentration of excreted faecal BA tended to increase in dogs fed the prebiotic (P=0·06). Our results indicate that higher doses of inulin-type prebiotics may serve as modulators of gut microbiota, metabolites and BA pool in overweight dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)711-720
Number of pages10
JournalThe British journal of nutrition
Volume120
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Keywords

  • Bile acids
  • Canine nutrition
  • SCFA
  • Second-meal effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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