Effects of plant-community composition on the vectorial capacity and fitness of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

Christopher M. Stone, Bryan T. Jackson, Woodbridge A. Foster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Dynamics of Anopheles gambiae abundance and malaria transmission potential rely strongly on environmental conditions. Female and male An. gambiae use sugar and are affected by its absence, but how the presence or absence of nectariferous plants affects An. gambiae abundance and vectorial capacity has not been studied. We report on four replicates of a cohort study performed in mesocosms with sugar-poor and sugar-rich plants, in which we measured mosquito survival, biting rates, and fecundity. Survivorship was greater with access to sugar-rich plant species, and mortality patterns were age-dependent. Sugar-poor populations experienced Weibull mortality patterns, and of four populations in the sugar-rich environment, two female and three male subpopulations were better fitted by Gompertz functions. A tendency toward higher biting rates in sugar-poor mesocosms, particularly for young females, was found. Therefore, vectorial capacity was pulled in opposing directions by nectar availability, resulting in highly variable vectorial capacity values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-736
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume87
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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