Effects of pelleting, extrusion, or extrusion and pelleting on energy and nutrient digestibility in diets containing different levels of fiber and fed to growing pigs

O. J. Rojas, E. Vinyeta, H. H. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to determine effects of pelleting, extrusion, and extrusion and pelleting on energy and nutrient digestibility in diets containing low, medium, or high concentrations of fiber. Three diets were formulated: 1) the low-fiber diet contained corn and soybean meal; 2) the medium-fiber diet contained corn, soybean meal, and 25% distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS); and 3) the high-fiber diet contained corn, soybean meal, 25% DDGS, and 20% soybean hulls. Each diet was divided into 4 batches after mixing. One batch was not further processed and was fed in a meal form, one batch was pelleted at 85°C, one batch was extruded at 115°C using a single screw extruder, and one batch was extruded at 115°C and then pelleted at 85°C. Thus, 12 different diets were produced. Twenty-four growing pigs (26.5 ± 1.5 kg initial BW) had a T-cannula installed in the distal ileum and were allotted to the 12 diets in a split-plot design with 8 pigs allotted to the low-fiber diets, the mediumfiber diets, and the high-fiber diets, respectively. Diets were fed to the pigs during four 14-d periods. Within each type of diet, the 8 pigs were fed the diets produced using the 4 processing technologies. Therefore, there were 8 replicate pigs per diet. Pigs were adjusted to their diets for 14 d before the experiment was initiated. Each of the four 14-d periods consisted of 5 d for adaptation, 5 d of fecal collection according to the marker to marker approach, and ileal digesta were collected on d 13 and 14. Results indicated that pelleting, extrusion, or extrusion and pelleting improved (P < 0.05) the apparent ileal digestibility of starch and most indispensable AA. In most cases, there were no differences between the pelleted, the extruded, and the extruded and pelleted diets. The apparent total tract digestibility of GE was also improved (P < 0.05) by pelleting and by the combination of extrusion and pelleting. The ME of pelleted diets was greater (P < 0.05) than that of meal diets for the low- and medium-fiber diets, but this was not the case for high-fiber diets (interaction, P < 0.05). Medium- and high-fiber diets that were extruded had greater ME (P < 0.05) than meal diets, but that was not the case for low-fiber diets. These data indicate that energy utilization may be improved by pelleting or extrusion or by a combination of the 2 technologies, but the response seems to be greater for extrusion in diets that are relatively high in fiber.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1951-1960
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume94
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2016

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Energy
  • Extrusion
  • Fiber
  • Pelleting
  • Pig

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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