Effects of pelleting diets without or with distillers’ dried grains with solubles on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and gastrointestinal weights of growing–finishing barrows and gilts

M. F. Overholt, J. E. Lowell, E. K. Arkfeld, I. M. Grossman, H. H. Stein, A. C. Dilger, D. D. Boler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pigs (192 total) were blocked by age and stratified by initial BW (25.75 ± 2.29 kg) into pens (2 barrows and 2 gilts per pen). Within blocks, pens were randomly allotted to treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, with 2 diet forms (meal vs. pellet) and 2 distillers’ dried grains with solubles (DDGS) inclusion levels (0 vs. 30%). Pigs were weighed at the beginning of the experiment and at the end of each feeding phase (d 35, 70, and 91) and daily feed allotments were recorded. Pigs were slaughtered at the end of the 91-d experiment, and full gastrointestinal (GI) tract and GI tract component weights were recorded immediately following evisceration. Carcass characteristics and meat quality were determined after a 24-h chill. Overall ADG was increased (P < 0.01) 3.2% when pigs were fed pelleted diets rather than meal diets, but there was no effect (P = 0.46) of DDGS inclusion on overall ADG. Overall ADFI of meal-fed pigs fed 30% DDGS was 4.7% greater (P < 0.01) than that of pigs fed 0% DDGS in meal form, but overall ADFI did not differ (P ≥ 0.19) between DDGS inclusion level in pellet-fed pigs (diet form × DDGS inclusion, P < 0.01). When fed meal diets, pigs fed 0% DDGS had 2.7% greater (P = 0.02) overall G:F than pigs fed 30% DDGS; however, there was no difference (P = 0.42) in overall G:F between DDGS inclusion levels in pigs fed pelleted diets (diet form × DDGS inclusion, P < 0.03). Pigs fed pelleted diets had 2.9% heavier HCW (P = 0.01), 10.4% greater 10th-rib back fat (P = 0.01), and 1.8 percentage units less estimated lean percentage (P = 0.04) than mealfed pigs. Full GI tracts of pigs fed pelleted diets were 0.33 percentage units less (P = 0.03) of the ending live weight than that of meal-fed pigs due to decreased (P < 0.01) GI tract contents. Inclusion of DDGS increased (P = 0.03) full GI tract weight, large intestine weight (P < 0.01), and GI tract contents (P = 0.02). Severity of parakeratosis of the pars esophagea was greater (P < 0.01) in pellet-fed pigs than in meal-fed pigs, but the magnitude of the difference was likely not great enough to negatively affect drop credit of stomachs. In conclusion, feeding pelleted diets improved growth performance and increased carcass weight and fatness without causing the development of gastric lesions that would reduce the value of the stomach to packers. Furthermore, inclusion of DDGS in diets reduced HCW and dressing percent and increased GI tract and GI tract contents weight but had no effect on gastric lesion development or LM quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2172-2183
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume94
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2016

Keywords

  • Diet form
  • Distillers’ dried grains with solubles
  • Morphology
  • Pellet
  • Pig
  • Ulcer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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