EFFECTS OF NATURAL ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D3 CONCENTRATIONS IN FEMALE GUINEA PIGS (CAVIA PORCELLUS)

Megan K. Watson, Jennifer Flower, Kenneth R Welle, Micah Kohles, Dave Webster, Heather Purdeu, Mark A. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Vertebrates have 2 methods of acquiring vitamin D: through the diet and/or secondary to exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Although some species (e.g., dogs) can only acquire vitamin D through their diet, many others also utilize UVB radiation to generate vitamin D. Prior to their extirpation, guinea pigs were naturally exposed to varying levels of sunlight (UVB) in their native habitat; however, in captivity we do not routinely recommend UVB radiation for these animals. Recently, it has been shown that captive guinea pigs can synthesize 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD3) after exposure to UVB lightbulbs. However, it is not known how natural sunlight impacts 25-OHD3 concentrations in this species. The purpose of this study was to determine whether 25-OHD3 concentrations in female guinea pigs exposed to natural sunlight would increase as a result of UVB exposure. Eight adult female guinea pigs were used for this study. The animals were held indoors during winter months and then placed outside in the spring when temperatures were appropriate. Blood samples were collected before the animals were placed outdoors (baseline) and 30 days after being exposed to natural sunlight. There was a significant difference in 25-OHD3 concentrations over time (P = 0.006) and values collected after the guinea pigs were housed outdoors were 1.8 times higher than baseline. This study confirmed that female guinea pigs can increase 25-OHD3 concentrations after exposure to natural sunlight. This suggests that these animals have conserved this pathway despite domestication, and supplementation should be considered to optimize captive guinea pig habitats.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1-5
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Exotic Pet Medicine
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Background Radiation
25-hydroxycholecalciferol
Calcifediol
guinea pigs
ultraviolet radiation
Guinea Pigs
Sunlight
solar radiation
vitamin D
Vitamin D
Radiation
Ecosystem
animals
Diet
habitats
domestication
diet
Vertebrates
vertebrates
Dogs

Keywords

  • Cavia porcellus
  • guinea pig
  • sunlight
  • ultraviolet B radiation
  • vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

EFFECTS OF NATURAL ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D3 CONCENTRATIONS IN FEMALE GUINEA PIGS (CAVIA PORCELLUS). / Watson, Megan K.; Flower, Jennifer; Welle, Kenneth R; Kohles, Micah; Webster, Dave; Purdeu, Heather; Mitchell, Mark A.

In: Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine, Vol. 28, 01.01.2019, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Watson, Megan K. ; Flower, Jennifer ; Welle, Kenneth R ; Kohles, Micah ; Webster, Dave ; Purdeu, Heather ; Mitchell, Mark A. / EFFECTS OF NATURAL ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D3 CONCENTRATIONS IN FEMALE GUINEA PIGS (CAVIA PORCELLUS). In: Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 28. pp. 1-5.
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