Effects of latitude and longitude on the population structure of Culex pipiens s.l., vectors of west Nile virus in North America

The Culex pipiens Working Group, F. Edillo, A. Kiszewski, J. Manjourides, M. Pagano, M. Hutchinson, A. Kyle, J. Arias, D. Gaines, Richard L. Lampman, R. J. Novak, I. Foppa, C. Lubelcyzk, R. Smith, A. Moncayo, A. Spielman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We assessed the structure and latitudinal selection that might result in sensitivities to critical day-lengths that trigger diapause between Culex pipiens populations distributed along North-South and East-West axes in eastern North America. Strong population structure between Cx. p. pipiens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus existed. Among Cx. p. pipiens, a 100-km increase in the latitudinal change resulted in an increased square root of FST by 0.002. A 100-km increase in the longitudinal change caused an increased square root of FST by 0.035. A lack of latitudinal influence on the structure between Cx. p. pipiens populations suggests a uniform signal using the 12 microsatellite markers, which might increase the risk of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission toward northern areas because of longer breeding season, extend host-seeking period, and larger population size. Northern Cx. p. pipiens may have undergone additional generations before diapause is triggered, magnifying population size when WNV amplification is peaking.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)842-848
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume81
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • INHS

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