Effects of hydrogen peroxide as a core sample processing solvent on invertebrate biomass

Heath M. Hagy, J. Scot McKnight

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Scientists estimate biomass of invertebrates to evaluate wetland management practices, estimate energetic carrying capacity for wildlife, assess habitat condition and disturbance, and quantify ecosystem services. For waterfowl and other waterbirds in North America, carrying capacity in migratory and wintering regions is estimated using food density, of which invertebrates can be a significant component. However, we are not aware of previous literature that has described the effects of reagents used during core sample processing on invertebrate biomass and abundance. We tested the effects of hydrogen peroxide on aquatic invertebrates to determine whether a reagent used to disassociate soils during core sample processing biased estimates of biomass and abundance. Wet masses of chironomid larvae were less (x=23.5% loss) in samples exposed to hydrogen peroxide than those exposed only to tap water and biomass decreased approximately 2.9% with each minute of exposure time. Dry mass of larvae was less in samples exposed to hydrogen peroxide than in those exposed only to tap water (x=2.5% loss), but we did not detect an effect of exposure time on mass lost. Hydrogen peroxide did not influence the abundance of macro- or microinvertebrates in test samples. Thus, bias associated with dry mass estimates of invertebrates from core samples treated with hydrogen peroxide is likely minimal in terms of application in energetic carrying capacity models. However, use of hydrogen peroxide during core sample processing may cause significant bias if biomass estimates are based on wet mass.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-448
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Fish and Wildlife Management
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2016

Fingerprint

hydrogen peroxide
invertebrate
invertebrates
biomass
carrying capacity
sampling
tap water
energetics
exposure duration
larva
wetland management
waterfowl
aquatic invertebrates
wildlife habitats
larvae
ecosystem service
water birds
macroinvertebrate
effect
management practice

Keywords

  • Core sample processing
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Invertebrate biomass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Effects of hydrogen peroxide as a core sample processing solvent on invertebrate biomass. / Hagy, Heath M.; Scot McKnight, J.

In: Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management, Vol. 7, No. 2, 12.2016, p. 444-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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