Effects of gonadal hormones on calcium-binding protein in chick duodenum

R. J. Navickis, O. K. Dial, B. S. Katzenellenbogen, A. V. Nalbandov

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Abstract

The effect of the sex steroid hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone) and vitamin D3, alone or in various combinations, on duodenal calcium-binding protein (CaBP) and wet weight was investigated in 7.5- to 10-wk-old female chicks. Chicks were either vitamin D-deficient or vitamin D-replete. Hormones were injected for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 8 days. The design in which injections were made for 8 days proved best for testing the effects of the gonadal hormones. Whereas neither diethylstilbestrol (DES, a synthetic estrogen), progesterone, nor testosterone, alone or in combination, could directly increase CaBP, DES did enhance the vitamin D-stimulated increase in CaBP in rachitic chicks. DES also significantly increased the CaBP levels in vitamin D-replete chicks, working, presumably, through endogenous vitamin D3. Moreover, in 8-day treatments, DES increased duodenal weight. In contrast, testosterone did not augment the action of vitamin D in either vitamin D-replete or -deficient chicks. Although progesterone did not enhance the action of vitamin D in rachitic chicks, when administered for 8 days to vitamin D-replete chicks, it significantly increased CaBP levels, although to a much smaller extent than did DES. In vitamin D-replete chicks, concomitant administration of progesterone or testosterone inhibited the DES-induced increase in CABP levels. Hence the gonadal hormones appear capable of modulating the action of vitamin D in the regulation of CaBP concentration in the duodenum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E409-E417
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology Endocrinology Metabolism and Gastrointestinal Physiology
Volume6
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

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Gonadal Hormones
Calcium-Binding Proteins
Duodenum
Vitamin D
Progesterone
Testosterone
Rickets
Cholecalciferol
Estradiol Congeners
Weights and Measures
Diethylstilbestrol
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Estrogens
Hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Effects of gonadal hormones on calcium-binding protein in chick duodenum. / Navickis, R. J.; Dial, O. K.; Katzenellenbogen, B. S.; Nalbandov, A. V.

In: American Journal of Physiology Endocrinology Metabolism and Gastrointestinal Physiology, Vol. 6, No. 5, 01.01.1979, p. E409-E417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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