Effects of feeding growing cattle high-concentrate diets at a restricted intake on feedlot performance.

S. C. Loerch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Three trials were conducted to compare effects of restricted intake of high-concentrate diets vs ad libitum intake of corn silage diets during the growing phase on feedlot cattle performance. In Trial 1, 120 steers (initial BW, 246 kg) were fed 1) a corn silage-based diet ad libitum, 2) a high-moisture corn-corn silage-based diet with intake restricted to a level 20% less than that of the corn silage diet or 3) a high-moisture corn-based diet with intake restricted to a level 30% less than that of the corn silage diet. Steers fed the 20% restricted corn-corn silage-based diet tended (P = .07) to gain slower than those fed the corn silage or 30% restricted high-concentrate diet. Feed efficiency and diet digestibility were greatest for steers fed the 30% restricted-intake, high-concentrate diet (P less than .01). Performance of steers during the subsequent 118-d finishing period was not affected (P greater than .65) by source of energy during the growing period. In Trial 2, ADG of steers fed the 30% intake-restricted, high-concentrate diet was lower (P less than .01) than that of steers with ad libitum access to corn silage. During the 84-d growing period, steers fed supplemental blood meal had 8.3% greater gains and a 6% greater efficiency of feed use than those fed supplemental soybean meal (P less than .01). Monensin did not affect (P = .82) performance of steers fed 30% restricted-intake diets. During the 76-d finishing period, gains and feed conversion were improved (P less than .01) for steers fed the restricted-intake diet in the growing period compared with those given ad libitum access to corn silage. During the growing period in Trial 3, ADG of steers restricted-fed an all-concentrate diet were slightly greater (P less than .10) than ADG of those given ad libitum access to corn silage. Gains did not differ (P = .37) during the subsequent finishing period when steers were switched to 85 or 100% concentrate diets. We concluded that intake of all concentrate diets can be restricted to achieve gains equal to those of steers given ad libitum access to corn silage-based diets without detrimental effects on finishing performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3086-3095
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume68
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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