Effects of Exercise on Stress-induced Attenuation of Vaccination Responses in Mice

Y. I. Sun, Brandt D. Pence, Selena Shiyue Wang, Jeffrey A Woods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Studies suggest that exercise can improve vaccination responses in humans. Chronic stress can lead to immunosuppression, and there may be a role for exercise in augmenting immune responses. Purpose To investigate the effects of acute eccentric exercise (ECC) and voluntary wheel exercise training (VWR) on antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to vaccination in chronically stressed mice. We hypothesized that both ECC and VWR would attenuate chronic stress-induced reductions in vaccination responses. Methods Mice were randomized into four groups: control (CON), stress (S)-ECC, S-VWR, and S-sedentary (SED). Stressed groups received chronic restraint stress for 6 h·d-1, 5 d·wk-1 for 3 wk. After the first week of stress, S-ECC were exercised at 17 m·min-1 speed at -20% grade for 45 min on a treadmill and then intramuscularly injected with 100 μg of ovalbumin (OVA) and 200 μg of alum adjuvant. All other groups were also vaccinated at this time. Stress-VWR mice voluntarily ran on a wheel for the entire experiment. Plasma was collected before, and at 1, 2, and 4 wk postvaccination. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to analyze anti-OVA IgG and IgM antibodies. After 3 wk of chronic stress, all mice were injected with OVA into the ear to determine the delayed-type hypersensitivity. Results We found that chronic restraint stress significantly reduced body weight and caused adrenal hypertrophy. We also found both S-ECC and S-VWR groups had significantly elevated anti-OVA IgG (P < 0.05), whereas no significant differences between the two exercise groups. Neither S-ECC nor S-VWR altered anti-OVA IgM or delayed-type hypersensitivity responses compared with S-SED group. Conclusions Acute eccentric exercise and voluntary exercise training alleviated the chronic stress-induced anti-OVA IgG reductions in vaccination responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1635-1641
Number of pages7
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume51
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

Fingerprint

Ovalbumin
Vaccination
Exercise
Delayed Hypersensitivity
Antibodies
Immunosuppression
Hypertrophy
Ear
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Body Weight
Control Groups
anti-IgG

Keywords

  • antibody responses
  • exercise
  • immunosuppression
  • mice
  • stress
  • vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effects of Exercise on Stress-induced Attenuation of Vaccination Responses in Mice. / Sun, Y. I.; Pence, Brandt D.; Wang, Selena Shiyue; Woods, Jeffrey A.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 51, No. 8, 01.08.2019, p. 1635-1641.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sun, Y. I. ; Pence, Brandt D. ; Wang, Selena Shiyue ; Woods, Jeffrey A. / Effects of Exercise on Stress-induced Attenuation of Vaccination Responses in Mice. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2019 ; Vol. 51, No. 8. pp. 1635-1641.
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