Effects of ethanol and heat treatments of soybean meal and infusion of sodium chloride into the rumen on ruminal degradation and escape of soluble and total soybean meal protein in steers.

G. L. Lynch, L. L. Berger, N. R. Merchen, G. C. Fahey, E. C. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Soybean meal (SBM) treated with 70% ethanol at 80 C (ET), nontreated SBM (NT) or a ureacasein-corn mix (UC) was fed to steers fitted with ruminal and duodenal cannulae to study ruminal N metabolism. Sodium chloride (NaCl) was ruminally infused at 0 or 500 g/d. Nitrogen supplements provided approximately 70% of total dietary N. Experimental design was a 6 X 6 Latin square with a 3 X 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Total duodenal N flows and non-ammonia, non-bacterial-N (NANB-N) flows were higher (P less than .05) when steers were fed SBM treatments compared with UC, and higher (P less than .05) when steers were fed ET compared with NT. Percentage of SBM-N escaping ruminal degradation was greater (P less than .05) when steers were fed ET compared with NT, and greater (P less than .05) when NaCl was infused into the rumen. Duodenal flows of total, indispensible and dispensible amino acids were increased (P less than .05) when steers were fed SBM treatments compared with UC, and greater (P less than .05) when steers were fed ET compared with NT. No differences in soluble N flows at the omasum were observed due to treatment. Bacterial protein comprised the majority of the N leaving the rumen. Both ruminal NaCl infusion and ethanol and heat treatment of SBM increased ruminal SBM-N escape.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1617-1625
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume65
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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