Effects of culture, gender, and moral obligations on responses to charity advertising across masculine and feminine cultures

Michelle R. Nelson, Frédéric F. Brunel, Magne Supphellen, Rajesh V. Manchanda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two studies investigated the effects of charity advertising on perceptions of moral obligation to help others and gauged ad evaluation. This was done in cultures that were similar in individualism but differed in either masculinity (United States and Canada) or femininity (Denmark and Norway). Participants read appeals that solicited donations to charity by focusing on either egoistic or altruistic motives. In masculine cultures, men preferred the egoistic ad and women preferred the altruistic one. In feminine cultures, where women are agentic and men are allowed to be nurturing, the opposite was the case. Exposure to both types of ads activated a sense of personal obligation among men in feminine nations and women in masculine nations. However, their opposite-sex counterparts reacted against these ads. Implications of these findings for an understanding of culture and sex differences in advertising effectiveness are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-56
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consumer Psychology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Marketing

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