Effects of CO2 enrichment on photosynthesis and photosynthate partitioning in soybean (Glycine max) leaves

S. C. Huber, H. Rogers, D. W. Israel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The short‐term and long‐term effects of CO, enrichment on certain aspects of photosynthesis and leaf carbohydrate metabolism were studied with soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] plants. In general, both long‐term and short‐term CO2 enrichment (300 ppm CO2 above ambient) of soybean plants resulted in increased rates of photosynthesis (per unit leaf area) and starch accumulation. Leaf sucrose concentrations were increased slightly, but the rate of assimilate export and activity of sucrose phosphate synthase (EC 2.4.1.14) were usually not increased. Plant N‐status affected the response of vegetative soybean ‘Ransom’ plants to short‐term CO, enrichment. When plants were N‐stressed (2 mM NO3‐ supplied), CO2 enrichment resulted in increased rates of both starch accumulation and export. As N‐supply was increased, partitioning of carbon into starch in CO2‐enriched atmospheres increased at the expense of assimilate export. When plants were grown with high‐N (20 mM NO3), the rate of assimilate export from CO2‐enriched leaves was reduced below the rate observed with plants maintained at ambient CO2. The reduction in export rate was associated with decreased activities of sucrose phosphate synthase in leaf extracts. The activity of sucrose phosphate synthase in leaf extracts was closely associated with partitioning of carbon between starch and sucrose in leaves, and with the rate of assimilate export.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-101
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiologia Plantarum
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1984

Keywords

  • Assimilate export
  • N‐nutrition. starch
  • sucrose
  • sucrose phosphate synthase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

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