Effectiveness of a 16-Week High-Intensity Cardioresistance Training Program in Adults

Tina A. Greenlee, Daniel R. Greene, Nathan J. Ward, Ginger E. Reeser, Courtney M. Allen, Nicholas W. Baumgartner, Neal J. Cohen, Arthur F. Kramer, Charles H. Hillman, Aron K. Barbey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Effectiveness of a 16-week high-intensity cardioresistance training program in adults. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2528-2541, 2017 - The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a novel, 16-week high-intensity cardioresistance training (HICRT) program on measures of aerobic fitness, agility, aerobic power, muscular endurance, lower-body explosive power, and self-reported activity level. The intervention group (N = 129; 63 f, 24.65 ± 5.55 years) had a baseline Vo 2 max of 39.83 ± 9.13. These individuals participated in 26, 70-minute exercise sessions, and 4 fitness testing sessions. Participants were matched with a nonexercise control group, paired by sex, age, and baseline Vo 2 max. Matched controls (N = 129, 63 f, 24.26 ± 5.59 years) had a baseline Vo 2 max of 39.86 ± 8.59 and completed preintervention and postintervention Vo 2 max testing only. The results demonstrate that participants in the fitness intervention group significantly increased their Vo 2 max (2.72 ± 0.31, M diff ± SE; p < 0.001) and reported being more physically active (0.42 ± 0.11, M diff ± SE; p < 0.001) after the intervention. The matched control group showed no significant pre-post intervention changes. Participants in the fitness intervention showed a significant improvement in 3 of 5 components of the fitness field tests. Specifically, significant improvements were observed for the 1-minute rower (5.32 ± 0.505, M diff ± SE; p < 0.001), 1-minute push-up (8.168 ± 0.709, M diff ± SE; p < 0.001), and 1.5-mile run tests (1.79 ± 0.169, M diff ± SE; p < 0.001). No significant improvements were observed for the shuttle run (p = 0.173) or standing long jump (p = 0.137). These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a novel, HICRT intervention across multiple dimensions of fitness for young- and middle-aged adults. High-intensity cardioresistance training affords flexibility for tailoring to meet desired health and fitness outcomes and makes perceivably daunting high-intensity functional training and multimodal sports training more accessible to general, traditionally nonathletic, populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2528-2541
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume31
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Keywords

  • aerobic fitness
  • functional training
  • intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effectiveness of a 16-Week High-Intensity Cardioresistance Training Program in Adults. / Greenlee, Tina A.; Greene, Daniel R.; Ward, Nathan J.; Reeser, Ginger E.; Allen, Courtney M.; Baumgartner, Nicholas W.; Cohen, Neal J.; Kramer, Arthur F.; Hillman, Charles H.; Barbey, Aron K.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 31, No. 9, 01.09.2017, p. 2528-2541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greenlee, TA, Greene, DR, Ward, NJ, Reeser, GE, Allen, CM, Baumgartner, NW, Cohen, NJ, Kramer, AF, Hillman, CH & Barbey, AK 2017, 'Effectiveness of a 16-Week High-Intensity Cardioresistance Training Program in Adults', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 31, no. 9, pp. 2528-2541. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001976
Greenlee, Tina A. ; Greene, Daniel R. ; Ward, Nathan J. ; Reeser, Ginger E. ; Allen, Courtney M. ; Baumgartner, Nicholas W. ; Cohen, Neal J. ; Kramer, Arthur F. ; Hillman, Charles H. ; Barbey, Aron K. / Effectiveness of a 16-Week High-Intensity Cardioresistance Training Program in Adults. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2017 ; Vol. 31, No. 9. pp. 2528-2541.
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