Effect of transportation and feed withdrawal on shedding of Salmonella Typhimurium among experimentally infected pigs

Richard E. Isaacson, Lawrence D Firkins, Ronald M. Weigel, Federico A Zuckermann, Joseph A. DiPietro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective - To determine whether stress associated with transportation or feed withdrawal increased fecal shedding of Salmonella Typhimurium among pigs experimentally infected with the organism. Animals - 86 healthy pigs. Procedure - Pigs were challenge exposed with Salmonella Typhimurium at 4 weeks old and reared conventionally. When pigs reached market weight, they were assigned to groups and subjected to various combinations of transportation and feed withdrawal. Ileocecal contents were collected after slaughter and tested for Salmonella Typhimurium. Results - Salmonella Typhimurium was not detected in feces collected from pigs just prior to slaughter. When feed was withheld for 24 hours prior to slaughter, the proportion of transported pigs with Salmonella Typhimurium in ileocecal contents at the time of slaughter was not significantly different from the proportion of nontransported pigs. However, when feed was not withheld prior to slaughter, the proportion of transported pigs with Salmonella Typhimurium in ileocecal contents at the time of slaughter was significantly higher than the proportion of nontransported pigs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - When carrier pigs remained on feed, transportation stress increased the proportion positive for Salmonella sp. On the basis of results reported here, it is suggested that producers withhold feed from pigs for 24 hours prior to transportation to a slaughter plant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1155-1158
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume60
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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