Effect of soybean variety and processing on growth performance of young chicks and pigs

M. F. Palacios, R. A. Easter, K. T. Soltwedel, C. M. Parsons, M. W. Douglas, T. Hymowitz, J. E. Pettigrew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine whether soybeans without the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and lectins could be fed effectively to young chicks and pigs. Specifically, we compared the growth performance of chicks and pigs fed diets containing modified soybeans: Kunitz trypsin inhibitor-free (KF), lectin-free (LF), lectin and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor-free (LFKF), conventional soybeans (CSB), and commercially obtained, dehulled, solvent-extracted soybean meal (SBM). A 7-d chick experiment was conducted to evaluate the nutritional value of CSB, KF, LF, LFKF, and SBM. The experiment was conducted as a completely randomized design, with four replicates, five treatments, and six male chicks per pen (n = 120). The five treatments consisted of 23% CP dextrose - soybean-based diets containing KF, LF, LFKF, CSB, or SBM as the source of dietary protein. A 28-d pig experiment was conducted to evaluate the nutritional value of CSB, LF, LFKF, and SBM. Pens of four pigs were assigned randomly to a control, corn - SBM, or one of six corn - soybean diets containing raw or extruded soybean varieties as a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments in a randomized complete block design with five blocks per treatment (n = 140). Chicks fed diets containing any of the raw soybean varieties gained less weight (P < 0.05) than chicks fed SBM (22.81 g/d for SBM vs. 14.17 g/d for the raw soybeans combined). Among the raw soybean treatments, there was a greater effect on growth performance (P < 0.05) by removing both lectins and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (ADG of 16.56 g for LFKF) than by removing each antinutritional factor separately (ADG of 14.38 and 14.11 g for KF and LF, respectively). Pig growth performance was different (P < 0.001) for SBM (ADG of 409 g) and all the varieties when extruded (ADG of 450 g for CSB, 417 g for LF, and 408 g for LFKF) compared with the raw soybean treatments (ADG of 101 g for CSB, 165 g for LF, and 266 g for LFKF). Among the raw soybean treatments, growth performance improved (P = 0.003) as the antinutritional factor, lectin, was removed from the soybean and improved further (P = 0.045) when both lectins and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor were removed. The growth-inhibiting effect of feeding modified soybeans to young animals was more detrimental for pigs than for chicks in our experiments. Soybeans without the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and lectins cannot be fed successfully to young chicks and pigs without heating.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1108-1114
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume82
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004

Keywords

  • Chicks
  • Growth
  • Lectin
  • Pigs
  • Soybean
  • Trypsin Inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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