Effect of immunological castration management strategy on lipid oxidation and sensory characteristics of bacon stored under simulated food service conditions

R. T. Herrick, M. A. Tavárez, B. N. Harsh, M. A. Mellencamp, Dustin Dee Boler, Anna Carol Dilger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of 1) immunological castration (Improvest, a gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate) management strategy (age at slaughter and time of slaughter after second dose) and 2) sex on lipid oxidation and sensory characteristics of bacon stored under simulated food service conditions. For Objective 1, immunological castration management strategies included 24-wk-old immunologically castrated (IC) barrows 4, 6, 8, or 10 wk after the second Improvest dose (ASD); 26-wk-old IC barrows 6 wk ASD; and 28-wk-old IC barrows 8 wk ASD (n = 63). Objective 2 (n = 97) included IC barrows, physically castrated (PC) barrows, and gilts slaughtered at 24, 26, and 28 wks of age. Bellies from 2 slaughter dates were manufactured into bacon under commercial conditions. Bacon slices were laid out on parchment paper, packaged in oxygen-permeable poly-vinyl–lined boxes, and frozen (−33°C) for 1, 4, 8, or 12 wk to simulate food service conditions. At the end of each storage period, bacon was evaluated for lipid oxidation, moisture and lipid content, and sensory characteristics. Data from both objectives were analyzed using the MIXED pro- cedure in SAS with belly as the experimental unit. For both objectives, as storage time increased, lipid oxidation of bacon increased (P < 0.01), regardless of management strategy or sex. Also, there was no sex or management strategy × week of frozen storage interaction for any traits evaluated (P ≥ 0.25). For Objective 1, lipid content of bacon from IC barrows increased as time of slaughter ASD increased (P < 0.05), regardless of age at slaughter. Additionally, there were no differences in sensory attributes of bacon across management strategies. For the evaluation of sex effects in Objective 2, lipid oxidation was greater (P < 0.05) in IC barrows compared with PC barrows but was not different than gilts (P > 0.05). After 12 wk of frozen storage, lipid oxidation values for IC barrows, PC barrows, and gilts were still below 0.5 mg malondialdehyde/kg of meat, the threshold at which trained panelists may deem a food to be rancid. In conclusion, bacon shelf life characteristics were not altered by the immunological castration management strategy and bacon from IC barrows was similar to bacon from gilts. Therefore, bacon from IC barrows would result in shelf life and sensory quality similar to PC barrows and gilts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3084-3092
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume94
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2016

Keywords

  • Bacon
  • Frozen storage
  • Improvest
  • Lipid oxidation
  • Sensory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of immunological castration management strategy on lipid oxidation and sensory characteristics of bacon stored under simulated food service conditions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this