Effect of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise

Robert W. Motl, Patrick J. O'Connor, Rod K. Dishman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This double-blind, within-subjects experiment examined the effect of ingesting a large dose of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise. Low-caffeine-consuming college-aged males (n = 16) ingested either caffeine (10 mg × kg-1 body weight) or placebo and 1 hour later completed 30 minutes of moderate intensity cycling exercise (60% V̇O2peak). The order of drug administration was counter-balanced. Perceptions of leg muscle pain as well as work rate, heart rate, and oxygen uptake (VO2) were recorded during exercise. Leg muscle pain ratings were significantly and moderately reduced after a high dose of caffeine. This observation suggests that prior reports showing caffeine improves endurance exercise performance might be partially explained by caffeine's hypoalgesic properties. It also suggests that moderate intensity cycling exercise has promise as a useful experimental model for the study of naturally occurring muscle pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)316-321
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pain
Volume4
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2003

Fingerprint

Myalgia
Caffeine
Leg
Exercise
Heart Rate
Placebos
Body Weight
Oxygen

Keywords

  • Adenosine receptors
  • Antinociception
  • Ergogenic aid
  • Hypoalgesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Effect of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise. / Motl, Robert W.; O'Connor, Patrick J.; Dishman, Rod K.

In: Journal of Pain, Vol. 4, No. 6, 08.2003, p. 316-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Motl, Robert W.; O'Connor, Patrick J.; Dishman, Rod K. / Effect of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise.

In: Journal of Pain, Vol. 4, No. 6, 08.2003, p. 316-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{307694078d904b93b0f0c0c4f6d3d431,
title = "Effect of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise",
abstract = "This double-blind, within-subjects experiment examined the effect of ingesting a large dose of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise. Low-caffeine-consuming college-aged males (n = 16) ingested either caffeine (10 mg × kg-1 body weight) or placebo and 1 hour later completed 30 minutes of moderate intensity cycling exercise (60% V̇O2peak). The order of drug administration was counter-balanced. Perceptions of leg muscle pain as well as work rate, heart rate, and oxygen uptake (VO2) were recorded during exercise. Leg muscle pain ratings were significantly and moderately reduced after a high dose of caffeine. This observation suggests that prior reports showing caffeine improves endurance exercise performance might be partially explained by caffeine's hypoalgesic properties. It also suggests that moderate intensity cycling exercise has promise as a useful experimental model for the study of naturally occurring muscle pain.",
keywords = "Adenosine receptors, Antinociception, Ergogenic aid, Hypoalgesia",
author = "Motl, {Robert W.} and O'Connor, {Patrick J.} and Dishman, {Rod K.}",
year = "2003",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1016/S1526-5900(03)00635-7",
volume = "4",
pages = "316--321",
journal = "Journal of Pain",
issn = "1526-5900",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise

AU - Motl,Robert W.

AU - O'Connor,Patrick J.

AU - Dishman,Rod K.

PY - 2003/8

Y1 - 2003/8

N2 - This double-blind, within-subjects experiment examined the effect of ingesting a large dose of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise. Low-caffeine-consuming college-aged males (n = 16) ingested either caffeine (10 mg × kg-1 body weight) or placebo and 1 hour later completed 30 minutes of moderate intensity cycling exercise (60% V̇O2peak). The order of drug administration was counter-balanced. Perceptions of leg muscle pain as well as work rate, heart rate, and oxygen uptake (VO2) were recorded during exercise. Leg muscle pain ratings were significantly and moderately reduced after a high dose of caffeine. This observation suggests that prior reports showing caffeine improves endurance exercise performance might be partially explained by caffeine's hypoalgesic properties. It also suggests that moderate intensity cycling exercise has promise as a useful experimental model for the study of naturally occurring muscle pain.

AB - This double-blind, within-subjects experiment examined the effect of ingesting a large dose of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise. Low-caffeine-consuming college-aged males (n = 16) ingested either caffeine (10 mg × kg-1 body weight) or placebo and 1 hour later completed 30 minutes of moderate intensity cycling exercise (60% V̇O2peak). The order of drug administration was counter-balanced. Perceptions of leg muscle pain as well as work rate, heart rate, and oxygen uptake (VO2) were recorded during exercise. Leg muscle pain ratings were significantly and moderately reduced after a high dose of caffeine. This observation suggests that prior reports showing caffeine improves endurance exercise performance might be partially explained by caffeine's hypoalgesic properties. It also suggests that moderate intensity cycling exercise has promise as a useful experimental model for the study of naturally occurring muscle pain.

KW - Adenosine receptors

KW - Antinociception

KW - Ergogenic aid

KW - Hypoalgesia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0042471725&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0042471725&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1526-5900(03)00635-7

DO - 10.1016/S1526-5900(03)00635-7

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 316

EP - 321

JO - Journal of Pain

T2 - Journal of Pain

JF - Journal of Pain

SN - 1526-5900

IS - 6

ER -