Effect of acute aerobic exercise and histamine receptor blockade on arterial stiffness in African Americans and Caucasians

Huimin Yan, Sushant M. Ranadive, Abbi D. Lane-Cordova, Rebecca M. Kappus, Michael A. Behun, Marc D. Cook, Jeffrey A. Woods, Kenneth R. Wilund, Tracy Baynard, John R. Halliwill, Bo Fernhall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

African Americans (AA) exhibit exaggerated central blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) in response to an acute bout of maximal exercise compared with Caucasians (CA). However, whether potential racial differences exist in central BP, elastic, or muscular arterial distensibility after submaximal aerobic exercise remains unknown. Histamine receptor activation mediates sustained postexercise hyperemia in CA but the effect on arterial stiffness is unknown. This study sought to determine the effects of an acute bout of aerobic exercise on central BP and arterial stiffness and the role of histamine receptors, in AA and CA. Forty-nine (22 AA, 27 CA) young and healthy subjects completed the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to take either histamine receptor antagonist or control placebo. Central blood BP and arterial stiffness measurements were obtained at baseline, and at 30, 60, and 90 min after 45 min of moderate treadmill exercise. AA exhibited greater central diastolic BP, elevated brachial PWV, and local carotid arterial stiffness after an acute bout of submaximal exercise compared with CA, which may contribute to their higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Unexpectedly, histamine receptor blockade did not affect central BP or PWV in AA or CA after exercise, but it may play a role in mediating local carotid arterial stiffness. Furthermore, histamine may mediate postexercise carotid arterial dilation in CA but not in AA. These observations provide evidence that young and healthy AA exhibit an exaggerated hemodynamic response to exercise and attenuated vasodilator response compared with CA. NEW & NOTEWORTHY African Americans are at greater risk for developing cardiovascular disease than Caucasians. We are the first to show that young and healthy African Americans exhibit greater central blood pressure, elevated brachial stiffness, and local carotid arterial stiffness following an acute bout of submaximal exercise compared with Caucasians, which may contribute to their higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, African Americans exhibit attenuated vasodilator response compared with Caucasians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)386-395
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume122
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2017

Keywords

  • African-American
  • Arterial stiffness
  • Central blood pressure
  • Exercise
  • Histamine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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    Yan, H., Ranadive, S. M., Lane-Cordova, A. D., Kappus, R. M., Behun, M. A., Cook, M. D., Woods, J. A., Wilund, K. R., Baynard, T., Halliwill, J. R., & Fernhall, B. (2017). Effect of acute aerobic exercise and histamine receptor blockade on arterial stiffness in African Americans and Caucasians. Journal of Applied Physiology, 122(2), 386-395. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.01115.2015