Economic effects of demographic dividend in Brazilian regions

Diogo Baerlocher, Stephen Lawrence Parente, Eduardo Rios-Neto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Exploiting heterogeneity across Brazilian micro-regions over the 1970–2000 period, this paper examines whether the demographic dividend extends beyond a pure accounting effect. Using a Sys-GMM approach, it finds evidence that changes in age structure have only pure accounting effects after controlling for human capital. Therefore, in the case of Brazilian micro-regions, there is a second demographic dividend, which is associated with education. This second dividend is the far more important of the two dividends in terms of economic growth. In a counterfactual exercise, we show that the accounting effect is responsible for less that 10% of the income gap between the poorest and richest regions in Brazil.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100198
JournalJournal of the Economics of Ageing
Volume14
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Fingerprint

economics
age structure
human capital
economic growth
Brazil
income
evidence
Dividends
Economic effect
Demographics
education
Economic growth
Education
Income gap
Age structure
Human capital
Exercise

Keywords

  • Convergence
  • Demographic dividend
  • Education dividend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Economic effects of demographic dividend in Brazilian regions. / Baerlocher, Diogo; Parente, Stephen Lawrence; Rios-Neto, Eduardo.

In: Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Vol. 14, 100198, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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