Ecological Response of Floodplain Restoration to Flooding Disturbance: A Comparison of the Effects of Heavy and Light Flooding

Michael Lemke, Andrew F. Casper, T. D. VanMiddlesworth, Heath M. Hagy, Jeffery Walk, Douglas Blodgett, Keenan Dungey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Major floods elicit calls for more comprehensive and multifaceted approaches to flood management. In the future, adding floodways and flood storage areas to traditional structural strategies (e.g., dams and levees) may be a viable strategy. Beyond reducing flood damages, there is growing societal interest in floodplain services, including nutrient processing and supporting fisheries and wildlife habitat. In April 2013, a record flood on the Illinois River created a natural floodplain management experiment within two restored, but disconnected floodplains. With the benefit of extensive preflood data at both sites, we evaluated the biological response to a minor (levee overtopping) and a major (levee failure) flooding event. Our intent was to test the ecological resilience of restored floodplains to these two alternative management scenarios. We hypothesized that a minor flood event would have little effect on ecosystem structure, whereas the major flood event would result in lower production and diversity of zooplankton, increase invasive vegetation and decrease desirable submerged and emergent aquatic vegetation, and decrease overall waterbird use. Case studies such as this are critically needed to inform policy makers and managers of the trade-offs between alternative floodplain connectivity regimes on ecological services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014
Subtitle of host publicationWater Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress
EditorsWayne C. Huber, Wayne C. Huber
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages1120-1127
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9780784413548
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
EventWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Portland, United States
Duration: Jun 1 2014Jun 5 2014

Publication series

NameWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress

Other

OtherWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders
CountryUnited States
CityPortland
Period6/1/146/5/14

Fingerprint

floodplain
flooding
disturbance
levee
flood damage
overtopping
ecosystem structure
vegetation
comparison
effect
restoration
connectivity
zooplankton
dam
fishery
nutrient
river
experiment
services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Lemke, M., Casper, A. F., VanMiddlesworth, T. D., Hagy, H. M., Walk, J., Blodgett, D., & Dungey, K. (2014). Ecological Response of Floodplain Restoration to Flooding Disturbance: A Comparison of the Effects of Heavy and Light Flooding. In W. C. Huber, & W. C. Huber (Eds.), World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress (pp. 1120-1127). (World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784413548.112

Ecological Response of Floodplain Restoration to Flooding Disturbance : A Comparison of the Effects of Heavy and Light Flooding. / Lemke, Michael; Casper, Andrew F.; VanMiddlesworth, T. D.; Hagy, Heath M.; Walk, Jeffery; Blodgett, Douglas; Dungey, Keenan.

World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress. ed. / Wayne C. Huber; Wayne C. Huber. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2014. p. 1120-1127 (World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Lemke, M, Casper, AF, VanMiddlesworth, TD, Hagy, HM, Walk, J, Blodgett, D & Dungey, K 2014, Ecological Response of Floodplain Restoration to Flooding Disturbance: A Comparison of the Effects of Heavy and Light Flooding. in WC Huber & WC Huber (eds), World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress. World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 1120-1127, World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders, Portland, United States, 6/1/14. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784413548.112
Lemke M, Casper AF, VanMiddlesworth TD, Hagy HM, Walk J, Blodgett D et al. Ecological Response of Floodplain Restoration to Flooding Disturbance: A Comparison of the Effects of Heavy and Light Flooding. In Huber WC, Huber WC, editors, World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2014. p. 1120-1127. (World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784413548.112
Lemke, Michael ; Casper, Andrew F. ; VanMiddlesworth, T. D. ; Hagy, Heath M. ; Walk, Jeffery ; Blodgett, Douglas ; Dungey, Keenan. / Ecological Response of Floodplain Restoration to Flooding Disturbance : A Comparison of the Effects of Heavy and Light Flooding. World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress. editor / Wayne C. Huber ; Wayne C. Huber. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2014. pp. 1120-1127 (World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress).
@inproceedings{b67ebf94bfe042f991bf1bf5972c652c,
title = "Ecological Response of Floodplain Restoration to Flooding Disturbance: A Comparison of the Effects of Heavy and Light Flooding",
abstract = "Major floods elicit calls for more comprehensive and multifaceted approaches to flood management. In the future, adding floodways and flood storage areas to traditional structural strategies (e.g., dams and levees) may be a viable strategy. Beyond reducing flood damages, there is growing societal interest in floodplain services, including nutrient processing and supporting fisheries and wildlife habitat. In April 2013, a record flood on the Illinois River created a natural floodplain management experiment within two restored, but disconnected floodplains. With the benefit of extensive preflood data at both sites, we evaluated the biological response to a minor (levee overtopping) and a major (levee failure) flooding event. Our intent was to test the ecological resilience of restored floodplains to these two alternative management scenarios. We hypothesized that a minor flood event would have little effect on ecosystem structure, whereas the major flood event would result in lower production and diversity of zooplankton, increase invasive vegetation and decrease desirable submerged and emergent aquatic vegetation, and decrease overall waterbird use. Case studies such as this are critically needed to inform policy makers and managers of the trade-offs between alternative floodplain connectivity regimes on ecological services.",
author = "Michael Lemke and Casper, {Andrew F.} and VanMiddlesworth, {T. D.} and Hagy, {Heath M.} and Jeffery Walk and Douglas Blodgett and Keenan Dungey",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1061/9780784413548.112",
language = "English (US)",
series = "World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress",
publisher = "American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)",
pages = "1120--1127",
editor = "Huber, {Wayne C.} and Huber, {Wayne C.}",
booktitle = "World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Ecological Response of Floodplain Restoration to Flooding Disturbance

T2 - A Comparison of the Effects of Heavy and Light Flooding

AU - Lemke, Michael

AU - Casper, Andrew F.

AU - VanMiddlesworth, T. D.

AU - Hagy, Heath M.

AU - Walk, Jeffery

AU - Blodgett, Douglas

AU - Dungey, Keenan

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Major floods elicit calls for more comprehensive and multifaceted approaches to flood management. In the future, adding floodways and flood storage areas to traditional structural strategies (e.g., dams and levees) may be a viable strategy. Beyond reducing flood damages, there is growing societal interest in floodplain services, including nutrient processing and supporting fisheries and wildlife habitat. In April 2013, a record flood on the Illinois River created a natural floodplain management experiment within two restored, but disconnected floodplains. With the benefit of extensive preflood data at both sites, we evaluated the biological response to a minor (levee overtopping) and a major (levee failure) flooding event. Our intent was to test the ecological resilience of restored floodplains to these two alternative management scenarios. We hypothesized that a minor flood event would have little effect on ecosystem structure, whereas the major flood event would result in lower production and diversity of zooplankton, increase invasive vegetation and decrease desirable submerged and emergent aquatic vegetation, and decrease overall waterbird use. Case studies such as this are critically needed to inform policy makers and managers of the trade-offs between alternative floodplain connectivity regimes on ecological services.

AB - Major floods elicit calls for more comprehensive and multifaceted approaches to flood management. In the future, adding floodways and flood storage areas to traditional structural strategies (e.g., dams and levees) may be a viable strategy. Beyond reducing flood damages, there is growing societal interest in floodplain services, including nutrient processing and supporting fisheries and wildlife habitat. In April 2013, a record flood on the Illinois River created a natural floodplain management experiment within two restored, but disconnected floodplains. With the benefit of extensive preflood data at both sites, we evaluated the biological response to a minor (levee overtopping) and a major (levee failure) flooding event. Our intent was to test the ecological resilience of restored floodplains to these two alternative management scenarios. We hypothesized that a minor flood event would have little effect on ecosystem structure, whereas the major flood event would result in lower production and diversity of zooplankton, increase invasive vegetation and decrease desirable submerged and emergent aquatic vegetation, and decrease overall waterbird use. Case studies such as this are critically needed to inform policy makers and managers of the trade-offs between alternative floodplain connectivity regimes on ecological services.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84935522811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84935522811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1061/9780784413548.112

DO - 10.1061/9780784413548.112

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84935522811

T3 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014: Water Without Borders - Proceedings of the 2014 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress

SP - 1120

EP - 1127

BT - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014

A2 - Huber, Wayne C.

A2 - Huber, Wayne C.

PB - American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)

ER -