Early medicaid expansion associated with reduced payday borrowing in California

Heidi Allen, Ashley Swanson, Jialan Wang, Tal Gross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined the impact of California's early Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act on the use of payday loans, a form of high-interest borrowing used by low- and middle-income Americans. Using a data set for the period 2009-13 (roughly twenty-four months before and twenty-four months after the 2011-12 Medicaid expansion) that covered the universe of payday loans from five large payday lenders with locations around the United States, we used a difference-in-differences research design to assess the effect of the expansion on payday borrowing, comparing trends in early-expansion counties in California to those in counties nationwide that did not expand early. The early Medicaid expansion was associated with an 11 percent reduction in the number of loans taken out each month. It also reduced the number of unique borrowers each month and the amount of payday loan debt. We were unable to determine precisely how and for whom the expansion reduced payday borrowing, since to our knowledge, no data exist that directly link payday lending to insurance status. Nonetheless, our results suggest that Medicaid reduced the demand for high-interest loans and improved the financial health of American families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1769-1776
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume36
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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