E. coli fate and transport in macroporous soils: Short-circuiting to the subsurface

G. A. Fox, R. Kanwar, Jorge Alberto Guzman Jaimes, C. K. Hoang, R. W. Malone, T. Moorman, C. Pederson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Pathogen concentrations in streamflow are commonly reported as a significant cause of water quality degradation throughout the world. Research has begun to attempt to model pathogen fate and transport, primarily through surface runoff mechanisms. A significant component of pathogen movement to streams commonly identified but not explicitly simulated in many models is pathogen movement to the subsurface, which can be important in several scenarios such as tile drainage systems. As colloidal contaminants, pathogens such as E. coli tend to become physically trapped in the soil matrix but can move quickly through soil macropores. In fact, concerns exist about the rapid transport of contaminants, such as pesticides, pathogens, and nutrients, from the soil surface to ground water through macropores. Recent research suggests short-circuiting or direct hydrologic connectivity between macropores and subsurface drains. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the current research regarding the fate and transport of E. coli through soil macropores and into subsurface drain systems. This paper reports early results from the first year of a multi-year study funded by the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service as part of the their National Research Initiative program. Field experiments to document short-circuiting by macropores are described and also laboratory data is presented from soil column experiments, capable of simulating surface-connected macropores, with artificial subsurface drainage boundary conditions. These column studies generated information regarding the importance of directly connected macropores on pathogen transport to subsurface drains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008
Subtitle of host publicationAhupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes
EventWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Honolulu, HI, United States
Duration: May 12 2008May 16 2008

Publication series

NameWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008
Volume316

Other

OtherWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a
CountryUnited States
CityHonolulu, HI
Period5/12/085/16/08

Fingerprint

macropore
Pathogens
Escherichia coli
pathogen
Soils
drain
soil
Drainage
Impurities
pollutant
Tile
soil column
Pesticides
Runoff
Nutrients
Water quality
streamflow
connectivity
Groundwater
soil surface

Keywords

  • Bacteria
  • Stream flow
  • Water quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Pollution

Cite this

Fox, G. A., Kanwar, R., Guzman Jaimes, J. A., Hoang, C. K., Malone, R. W., Moorman, T., & Pederson, C. (2008). E. coli fate and transport in macroporous soils: Short-circuiting to the subsurface. In World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008 (World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008; Vol. 316). https://doi.org/10.1061/40976(316)32

E. coli fate and transport in macroporous soils : Short-circuiting to the subsurface. / Fox, G. A.; Kanwar, R.; Guzman Jaimes, Jorge Alberto; Hoang, C. K.; Malone, R. W.; Moorman, T.; Pederson, C.

World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008. 2008. (World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008; Vol. 316).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Fox, GA, Kanwar, R, Guzman Jaimes, JA, Hoang, CK, Malone, RW, Moorman, T & Pederson, C 2008, E. coli fate and transport in macroporous soils: Short-circuiting to the subsurface. in World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008. World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008, vol. 316, World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a, Honolulu, HI, United States, 5/12/08. https://doi.org/10.1061/40976(316)32
Fox GA, Kanwar R, Guzman Jaimes JA, Hoang CK, Malone RW, Moorman T et al. E. coli fate and transport in macroporous soils: Short-circuiting to the subsurface. In World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008. 2008. (World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008). https://doi.org/10.1061/40976(316)32
Fox, G. A. ; Kanwar, R. ; Guzman Jaimes, Jorge Alberto ; Hoang, C. K. ; Malone, R. W. ; Moorman, T. ; Pederson, C. / E. coli fate and transport in macroporous soils : Short-circuiting to the subsurface. World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008. 2008. (World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua'a - Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008).
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