Dyadic moderators of the effectiveness of problem-focused and emotional-approach coping interventions

John P. Baker, Howard Berenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A prospective dyadic study examined whether supportive or unsupportive behaviors of a partner and individual differences in attention to emotion moderated the effectiveness of problem-focused and emotional-approach coping interventions. At Time 1, dimensions of emotional experience were assessed using self-report. Several days later participants (two friends of the same gender) were randomly assigned to either a problem-focused or an emotional-approach coping intervention. Positive affect, negative affect, and anhedonic depression were measured at Time 1 and at Time 2, 2 weeks subsequent to the intervention. The levels of perceived support provided by a partner, an individual's own level of attention to emotion, and individual × partner interactions moderated the success of the coping interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)550-559
Number of pages10
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Keywords

  • Attention to emotions
  • Emotional-approach coping
  • Problem-focused coping
  • Supportive behavior
  • Unsupportive behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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