Duration of rapamycin treatment has differential effects on metabolism in mice

Yimin Fang, Reyhan Westbrook, Cristal Hill, Ravneet K. Boparai, Oge Arum, Adam Spong, Feiya Wang, Martin A. Javors, Jie Chen, Liou Y. Sun, Andrzej Bartke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The evolutionarily conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling controls growth, metabolism, and aging. In the first robust demonstration of pharmacologically-induced life extension in mammals, longevity was extended in mice treated with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mechanistic TOR (mTOR). However, detrimental metabolic effects of rapamycin treatment were also reported, presenting a paradox of improved survival despite metabolic impairment. How rapamycin extended lifespan in mice with such paradoxical effects was unclear. Here we show that detrimental effects of rapamycin treatment were only observed during the early stages of treatment. These effects were reversed or diminished in mice treated for 20 weeks, with better metabolic profiles, increased oxygen consumption and ketogenesis, and markedly enhanced insulin sensitivity. Thus, prolonged rapamycin treatment lead to beneficial metabolic alterations, consistent with life extension previously observed. Our findings provide a likely explanation of the "rapamycin paradox" and support the potential causal importance of these metabolic alterations in longevity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)456-462
Number of pages7
JournalCell Metabolism
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 5 2013

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Sirolimus
Life Expectancy
Metabolome
Oxygen Consumption
Insulin Resistance
Mammals
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Fang, Y., Westbrook, R., Hill, C., Boparai, R. K., Arum, O., Spong, A., ... Bartke, A. (2013). Duration of rapamycin treatment has differential effects on metabolism in mice. Cell Metabolism, 17(3), 456-462. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2013.02.008

Duration of rapamycin treatment has differential effects on metabolism in mice. / Fang, Yimin; Westbrook, Reyhan; Hill, Cristal; Boparai, Ravneet K.; Arum, Oge; Spong, Adam; Wang, Feiya; Javors, Martin A.; Chen, Jie; Sun, Liou Y.; Bartke, Andrzej.

In: Cell Metabolism, Vol. 17, No. 3, 05.03.2013, p. 456-462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fang, Y, Westbrook, R, Hill, C, Boparai, RK, Arum, O, Spong, A, Wang, F, Javors, MA, Chen, J, Sun, LY & Bartke, A 2013, 'Duration of rapamycin treatment has differential effects on metabolism in mice', Cell Metabolism, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 456-462. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2013.02.008
Fang Y, Westbrook R, Hill C, Boparai RK, Arum O, Spong A et al. Duration of rapamycin treatment has differential effects on metabolism in mice. Cell Metabolism. 2013 Mar 5;17(3):456-462. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2013.02.008
Fang, Yimin ; Westbrook, Reyhan ; Hill, Cristal ; Boparai, Ravneet K. ; Arum, Oge ; Spong, Adam ; Wang, Feiya ; Javors, Martin A. ; Chen, Jie ; Sun, Liou Y. ; Bartke, Andrzej. / Duration of rapamycin treatment has differential effects on metabolism in mice. In: Cell Metabolism. 2013 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 456-462.
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