Dose relations between goal setting, theory-based correlates of goal setting and increases in physical activity during a workplace trial

Rod K. Dishman, Robert J. Vandenberg, Robert W. Motl, Mark G. Wilson, David M. Dejoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effectiveness of an intervention depends on its dose and on moderators of dose, which usually are not studied. The purpose of the study is to determine whether goal setting and theory-based moderators of goal setting had dose relations with increases in goal-related physical activity during a successful workplace intervention. A group-randomized 12-week intervention that included personal goal setting was implemented in fall 2005, with a multiracial/ethnic sample of employees at 16 geographically diverse worksites. Here, we examined dose-related variables in the cohort of participants (N=664) from the 8 worksites randomized to the intervention. Participants in the intervention exceeded 9000 daily pedometer steps and 300 weekly minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during the last 6 weeks of the study, which approximated or exceeded current public health guidelines. Linear growth modeling indicated that participants who set higher goals and sustained higher levels of self-efficacy, commitment and intention about attaining their goals had greater increases in pedometer steps and MVPA. The relation between change in participants' satisfaction with current physical activity and increases in physical activity was mediated by increases in self-set goals. The results show a dose relation of increased physical activity with changes in goal setting, satisfaction, self-efficacy, commitment and intention, consistent with goal-setting theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)620-631
Number of pages12
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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